When viruses infect phytoplankton, it can change the clouds

Microscopic plant-like organisms called phytoplankton support the diversity of life in the ocean. Scientists now report that one species, Emiliania huxleyi, and a virus closely associated with it, might be responsible for changes in cloud properties as well. When infected, E. huxleyi releases its chalky shell into the air, where it acts as an aerosol reflecting sunlight and even affecting cloud creation and movement.

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Light-emitting nanoparticles could provide a safer way to image living cells

A research team has demonstrated how light-emitting nanoparticles can be used to see deep in living tissue. Researchers hope they can be made to attach to specific components of cells to serve in an advanced imaging system that can pinpoint even single cancer cells.

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Stern of World War II US destroyer discovered off remote Alaskan island

In the midst of World War II on August 18, 1943, the USS Abner Read struck what was presumed to be a Japanese mine in the Bering Sea. The catastrophic blast took the lives of 71 American sailors. For their families, the final resting place of loved ones lost remained unknown. Until now. On July 16, 2018, a team of researchers using robotics technology discovered the sunken stern of the World War II destroyer -- solving a 75-year-old mystery.

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New technique for modeling turbulence in the atmosphere

Researchers have designed a computer model that more effectively calculates the behavior of atmospheric turbulence in complex environments, including cities, forests, deserts and mountainous regions.

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Iron-silica particles unlock part of the mystery of Earth's oxygenation

The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere was thanks, in part, to iron and silica particles in ancient seawater, according to a new study by geomicrobiologists. But these results solve only part of this ancient mystery.

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Pacific Ocean's effect on Arctic warming

New research shows that changes in the heat flow of the northern Pacific Ocean may have a larger effect on the Arctic climate than previously thought.

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