3 Portland Hikes to Beat the Heat

It’s hot. In mid-July, the Portland area hit triple digits for the first time in 2018, and locals and visitors alike are searching for ways to deal with the heat wave. But it’s not just Portland; this summer brought a record-breaking streak of high temperatures to the entire Pacific Northwest, making the outdoors (and any […]

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Scorching Summer Heatwaves: Explained

Massive heatwaves have hit all but two of Earth’s continents. Luckily for the penguins, it’s still cold in Antarctica. But, not as cold as it used to be. The levels of sea ice are the eighth-smallest they’ve been since records began in 1979. The arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the […]

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DIY: Emergency Preparedness Kit

Disaster can strike anywhere, any time. The type of disaster you’re most likely to face will vary across different regions. For example, maybe your region is more susceptible to tornados than earthquakes. Or, maybe you live in an area where tsunamis, wildfires or landslides are a risk. Regardless of what poses the greatest threat, being […]

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Female chimpanzees know which males are most likely to kill their babies

Researchers examined the behavior of female chimpanzees in the Budongo Forest, Uganda, where chimpanzees (at least in the study community) are particularly prone to committing and suffering infanticide.

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Biodiversity can also destabilize ecosystems

According to the prevailing opinion, species-rich ecosystems are more stable against environmental disruptions such as drought, hot spells or pesticides. The situation is not as simple as it seems, however, as ecologists have now discovered. Under certain environmental conditions, increased biodiversity can also lead to an ecosystem becoming more unstable.

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Sculpting bacteria into extreme shapes reveals the rugged nature of cell division

Stars, triangles and pentagons demonstrate the adaptability and robustness of bacterial cell division machinery.

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Tracking the movement of the tropics 800 years into the past

For the first time, scientists have traced the north-south shifts of the northern-most edge of the tropics back 800 years. The movement of the tropical boundary affects the locations of Northern Hemisphere deserts including the Sonoran, Mohave and Saharan. The Earth's climate system affects the movement of the tropics, which have been expanding since the 1970s. The research team found that in the past, periods of tropical expansion coincided with severe droughts.

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Fast, accurate estimation of the Earth's magnetic field for natural disaster detection

Researchers have applied machine-learning techniques to achieve fast, accurate estimates of local geomagnetic fields using data taken at multiple observation points, potentially allowing detection of changes caused by earthquakes and tsunamis. A deep neural network (DNN) model was developed and trained using existing data; the result is a fast, efficient method for estimating magnetic fields for unprecedentedly early detection of natural disasters. This is vital for developing effective warning systems that might help reduce casualties and widespread damage.

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All eyes on Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael plowed into the Florida panhandle Wednesday, Oct. 10, as a major Category 4 storm -- the strongest hurricane ever to hit that region. Many NASA instruments are keeping tabs on Michael from space.

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