3 Portland Hikes to Beat the Heat

It’s hot. In mid-July, the Portland area hit triple digits for the first time in 2018, and locals and visitors alike are searching for ways to deal with the heat wave. But it’s not just Portland; this summer brought a record-breaking streak of high temperatures to the entire Pacific Northwest, making the outdoors (and any […]

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Scorching Summer Heatwaves: Explained

Massive heatwaves have hit all but two of Earth’s continents. Luckily for the penguins, it’s still cold in Antarctica. But, not as cold as it used to be. The levels of sea ice are the eighth-smallest they’ve been since records began in 1979. The arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the […]

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DIY: Emergency Preparedness Kit

Disaster can strike anywhere, any time. The type of disaster you’re most likely to face will vary across different regions. For example, maybe your region is more susceptible to tornados than earthquakes. Or, maybe you live in an area where tsunamis, wildfires or landslides are a risk. Regardless of what poses the greatest threat, being […]

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How mammals' brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at

Neuroscientists have discovered that at least six types of mammals -- from mice to cats -- distinguish odors in roughly the same way, using circuitry in the brain that's evolutionarily preserved across species.

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Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions

When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. They can cut through massive swaths of forest, destroying trees and wildlife habitat, and opening up opportunities for invasive species to gain ground.

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Modeling predicts blue whales' foraging behavior, aiding population management efforts

Scientists can predict where and when blue whales are most likely to be foraging for food in the California Current Ecosystem, providing new insight that could aid in the management of the endangered population in light of climate change and blue whale mortality due to ship strikes.

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Human influence on global droughts goes back 100 years, NASA study finds

Human-generated greenhouse gases and atmospheric particles were affecting global drought risk as far back as the early 20th century, according to a new study.

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Scientists discover what powers celestial phenomenon STEVE

The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic electrons like those that power the aurora, according to new research. In a new study, scientists found STEVE's source region in space and identified two mechanisms that cause it.

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Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay

Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in air flowing out to sea from Silicon Valley and the Salinas Valley could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving in Monterey Bay waters by about 20 percent.

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